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Becoming a CEO of a Global Brand
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HYPER
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Hyperjuice-100w-GaN-Charger-Design-2
HYPER
Creator Stories

 

Daniel Chin has Kickstarter campaigns down to a science. The formula Chin and his company, Sanho Corporation, developed for successful crowdfunding led to campaigns that regularly surpass $1 million. In their last two campaigns, he raised $100,000 in less than an hour. HYPER by Sanho Corporation, which is based in Silicon Valley, makes innovative, high quality connectivity and power storage products for computers and smartphones. Their products are distributed in online stores through their website and Amazon, but also at retailers like Best Buy and similar stores around the world. It can be a challenge for startups to get their products placed in big-box retailers but the buzz around HYPER’s products and a campaign that raised $3.1 million caught their attention. 

Chin started his first company in Singapore six months after graduating with an electrical engineering degree in 2002. The company specialized in distribution and successfully expanded to retail stores in Singapore, the region, and worldwide but there was one market that Chin couldn’t penetrate, the U.S. In 2005, to solve this problem Chin moved to the U.S. to the one area where he had family: the Silicon Valley. He started working out of his cousin’s apartment first on products that catered to storage needs for digital cameras. By 2009 with Apple products on the rise, he sensed it was an opportunity and turned his focus to Apple accessories. To promote HYPER’s high quality and innovative products, Chin forged relationships with the media, specifically tech blogs, attended global trade shows like CES and IFA, and applied for innovation and design awards, which HYPER won. “If everyone is talking about you it is hard not to get noticed,” Chin said. Now, the company focuses on selling to worldwide customers, including translating the website into 100 languages and transactions in 100 global currencies, which immediately led to an increase in overseas sales. 

“We invest a lot into our brand: customers know that when they buy HYPER they are buying the best product on the market,” Chin said. In October 2016, Apple announced that its new MacBook Pro—its best selling laptop—would only be using USB-C ports. HYPER created a hub for the new model, started a successful Kickstarter campaign and while at CES, Best Buy approached Chin about carrying the product. The CEO runs a global company with a fairly small team, and when asked what is his secret to success and how he can maintain such a successful pace, Chin smiles, “I always have a plan, it is not stressful if you have a game plan and know how to achieve it. However, I also know that I can’t control everything. You should only stress about things you can control.”

 

Daniel’s Story

Daniel Chin has Kickstarter campaigns (https://www.kickstarter.com/profile/hypershop/created) down to a science. The formula Chin and his company, Sanho Corporation, developed for successful crowdfunding led to campaigns that regularly surpass $1 million. In their last two campaigns, he raised $100,000 in less than an hour. HYPER by Sanho Corporation, which is based in Silicon Valley, makes innovative, high-quality data connectivity and portable power products for computers and smartphones. Their products are not only sold online on their website and Amazon but also at major retailers like Best Buy and similar brick and mortar stores around the world. It can be a challenge for startups to get their products placed in big-box retailers but the buzz around HYPER’s products and a campaign that raised $3.1 million caught their attention.

 

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